Cassandra Clare shares more deleted scenes from ‘City of Heavenly Fire’

Shadowhunters, are you ready for two more early Christmas treats? Cassandra Clare shared another comic strip scene from City of Heavenly Fire and also a cut scene that features Jonathan Morgenstern/Sebastian Verlac.

In the spirit of the holidays, more deleted and cut things! In this case, the comic Cassandra Jean drew for some editions of City of Heavenly Fire. It’s a scene I sketched out but deleted (there’s nothing written to post, just notes) because it didn’t fit — Magnus sends Emma, Julian and the Blackthorns back through a Portal to Los Angeles. Jace and Clary come to say goodbye. The passing of the torch, to a new group. And some Clace. :)

And here’s the cut scene:

I haven’t got much in the way of substantive cut scenes from City of Heavenly Fire. Most things were rewritten rather than removed. But here’s a bit of Sebastian’s death scene that didn’t make it in.

“We forgive you,” Jocelyn said. She was still crying, in the same soundless terrible way, just as she had every year on Jonathan’s birthday when she had held the box with his initials on it and wept.

“No,” he said. “There’s no forgiveness for what I did. I know where I will burn when I die.”

“Heaven does not forgive, but mothers do,” said Jocelyn. “When you were a baby inside me, I dreamed of everything for you. That you would be handsome and strong and good. That I would sing to you and love you and take care of you.” She gripped his hand tightly. “Maybe not in this world, but in another, I believe that was the truth.”

“Don’t forgive me,” he whispered. “Hate me. Rejoice that I’m dead. After all I have done, the last thing I would wish to bring to you was more grief.”

“Jonathan,” Clary whispered.

His eyes moved toward her. “And sisters,” he said. “Do sisters forgive?”

Aww 😢

All the feels, right? Tell us your thoughts in the comments and check out the unedited Clary and Jace cave scene and the other comic strip scene in case you missed them!

Have yourself a Merry Shadowhunter Christmas/holiday!

December

Art by Cassandra Jean

We’ve got three weeks until Christmas and sometimes finding great gifts for family and friends or also yourself can be pretty tough.

That’s why we have come up with the ultimate Shadowhunter Christmas wishlist that includes books (duh!), jewelry, tarot cards and more!

Shadowhunter Books:

(click the pictures to get to Amazon.com)

The Mortal Instruments complete box set

The Mortal Instruments complete box set

The Infernal Devices box set

The Infernal Devices box set

The Bane Chronicles

The Bane Chronicles

The Shadowhunter's Codex

The Shadowhunter’s Codex

The Infernal Devices: Clockwork Angel

The Infernal Devices: Clockwork Angel

The Infernal Devices: Clockwork Prince

The Infernal Devices: Clockwork Prince

clockwork princess manga

The Infernal Devices: Clockwork Princess

Shadowhunters and Downworlders

Shadowhunters and Downworlders

Shadowhunter Tarot Cards by Cassandra Clare and Cassandra Jean:

(click the pictures to get to TopatoCo)

Shadowhunter Tarot Cards: Deluxe Collector's Edition

Shadowhunter Tarot Cards: Deluxe Collector’s Edition (Pic credit: TopatoCo)

Shadowhunter Tarot Cards

Shadowhunter Tarot Cards (regular edition. Pic credit: TopatoCo)

Shadowhunter Merchandise by HebelDesign:

 

Remember that the first ebook from Tales from the Shadowhunter Academy will be released in February 2015, so an ebook gift card would be a nice present as well!

Everyone at TMI Source wishes you a happy Christmas time or a fabulous December :-)

Cassandra Clare shares comic strip scene from ‘City of Heavenly Fire’

We still have more than three weeks until Christmas, but Cassandra Clare is already spoiling her fans with City of Heavenly Fire goodies! (Thank you, Cassie!)

Cassie has very recently shared the uncut Clary and Jace cave scene and now she has posted a comic strip that was in the UK edition of City of Heavenly Fire. Said comic is actually from The Infernal Devices and it is called “The Wedding”.

London, 2009, so a year after the events of City of Heavenly Fire. There are some clues in here for Dark Artifices and even for Shadowhunter Academy, so if you hate spoilers, avoid!

Comic1Comic2Comic3Comic4Comic5Comic6

A lot of people have asked if Will is “really there” or is a ghost. I never thought of Will ever haunting the world after his death. He had a good life and a good death and has no reason to hang around. There’s an implication in the comic that this is Will’s “one trip” from the afterlife, but an equal implication, I think, that he’s not there at all, and is just a figment of the imaginations of those who so badly want to see him.

You can decide what you want to believe. :)

* Art by Cassandra Jean of course!

Aw, all of our beloved characters gathered for a joyous event! :-) How many feels do you have right now? Tell us in the comments and don’t forget that there is another City of Heavenly Fire comic strip that we can look forward to!

TMI TV Tuesday: Addressing the Casting Situation

TMI cut

On Tuesdays and Thursdays, TMI Source and Fangirlish are bringing you TMI TV Tuesdays and Thursdays, where we discuss different aspects regarding the upcoming television adaptation of The Mortal Instruments.

When news about The Mortal Instruments making its way to the small screen first broke, the immediate reaction for a bulk of the fandom was: “What about the original cast?” “Will there be a new cast?” “But I want the original cast!”

It was a natural and expected reaction from a passionate fandom that went through a long and strenuous journey with Lily Collins, Jamie Campbell Bower, Robert Sheehan, Kevin Zegers, Jemima West, etc. with the film adaptation of City of Bones. The cast became like family as they showered the fans with love and thanks and put their everything into bringing Cassandra Clare’s beloved characters to life.

But that was the movie adaptation.

Now that The Mortal Instruments is making a transition to television, it’s all but guaranteed that there will be a new cast portraying these beloved characters. New faces and new takes on the characters we’ve seen brought to life through words and through the big screen. It’s just the nature of entertainment.

All this is is a new version of the story we’ve all fallen in love with. Whatever is done on the small screen will not take away from what we saw on the big screen and read in the books, just like the film adaptation took nothing away from the original source material.

Here’s the thing, nobody can replace the movie cast. And nobody’s asking them to. Nothing can take away what Lily, Jamie, Robbie, Kevin and Jemima did with their performances and their love and kindness for the fans and the characters. All I’m asking is that you to keep an open mind.

When casting eventually begins for The Mortal Instruments TV show, don’t hate it. Don’t hate the actors. Embrace it and embrace them. Because those actors — whose identities we don’t know yet — are going to be our new family. People have more than one family, and this is just another one we’ll soon add to our list.

Other fandoms should be so lucky to get not one not two but three different and unique takes on the story they love.

Angelic Power Rune

Head over to FANGIRLISH on Thursday to read their thoughts about the casting situation with The Mortal Instruments TV show, and check back here Tuesdays for TMI TV TUESDAYS.

What are your thoughts? Are you open to the idea of a new cast given the likelihood the original film cast won’t return?

Cassandra Clare shares unedited Clary and Jace cave scene from ‘City of Heavenly Fire’

I was feeling bad about being unforthcoming with spoilers, so have some Clace feels from Cassandra Jean’s postcard set for City of Heavenly Fire! (Yes, these are all scenes that happen.)

Art by Cassandra Jean

Yes, you read that right! Six months after the release of City of Heavenly Fire – can you believe it’s been half a year already? - Cassandra Clare has shared the unedited Clace cave scene with her fans.

Are you ready for the complete DSES (Dirty Sexy Edom Scene)?

You demand zee sexytimes? Fine, here they are! I break! My will = shattered. Okay, so basically this is just the Jace and Clary cave scene (yes, THAT one) from CoHF before it was edited down for length and Less Obviousness About What Was Happening. I don’t think they actually do anything different here, and really it’s a scene about people having feelings about sex rather than particularly about sex. But enjoy! Um, happy Thanksgiving!

…For a moment Jace just looked at her in astonishment, his lips parted slightly; Clary felt her cheeks flush. He was looking at her like she was the first star that had ever come out in the sky, a miracle painted across the face of the world that he could barely believe in. He swallowed. “Let me —“ he said, and broke off. “Can I kiss you? Please?”

Instead of nodding, she leaned down to press her lips to his. If their first kiss in the water had been an explosion, this was a sun going supernova. A hard, hot, driving kiss, a nip at her lower lip and the clash of tongues and teeth, both of them pressing as hard as they could to get closer.  They were glued together, skin and fabric, a heady mix of the chill of the water, the heat of their bodies, and the frictionless slide of damp skin.

Jace lifted her, dragging her up his body, and she felt him suck in his breath at the contact. His hands slid under her, grasping her thighs as he walked them both out of the lake. The cold air hit her body and she shuddered; Jace went down on his knees on the powdery sand beach, laying her gently atop the pile of their heaped clothes.

Clary stretched her body out, trying to line herself up with him, and saw his eyes darken as he watched her. Her wet underclothes clung to her body as Jace’s clung to his. She let her eyes roam over him, taking in what was familiar and what wasn’t: the flare of his shoulders, the curve of his waist, the scars on his skin … her gaze dipped lower …

He laughed, a low, dark rasp. “It’s a little unfair,” he said, breathlessly, “that you can tell how much I want this just by looking at me and I can’t tell the same thing about you.”

She shifted under him. Their bodies scraped together and his pulse jumped, his hands digging into the sand on either side of her. “Look at me,” she said.

His eyes had been half-lidded; he opened them wide now, and stared at her. There was hunger in his, a hot devouring hunger that would have frightened her if it had been anyone else but Jace. But it was Jace, and she trusted him. “Look at me,” she said, and his eyes raked her, adoring, devouring, swallowing, and her body felt as if burning liquid were surging through it everywhere his gaze touched. He dragged his eyes back up to her face: they fixed on her mouth. “I do want you,” she said. “I always have.” She kissed him, slow and hard. “I want to, if you do.”

“If I want to?” There was a wild edge to his soft laugh. She could hear the soft rasp of sand between his fingers, saw the hesitation in his eyes, the concern for her, and she lifted herself up and wrapped her legs around his hips. He pressed his hot face into her throat, his breath ragged. “If you do that — I won’t be able to stop —“

“Don’t stop, I don’t want you to stop,” she said, and tightened her grip on him, and with a growl he took her mouth again, hot and demanding, sucking her lower lip into his mouth, his tongue sliding against hers. She tasted him in her mouth, the salt of sweat and cave water. She had never been kissed like this before, even by Jace. His tongue explored her mouth before he moved down her throat: she felt wet heat at the hollow of her collarbone and almost screamed. She grabbed at him instead, running her hands all over his body, wildly free in the knowledge that she could touch him, as much as she liked, however she liked. She felt as if she were drawing him, her hands mapping his shape, the slope of his back, flat stomach, the indentations above his hips, the muscles in his arms. As if, like a painting, he were coming to life under her hands.

When his hands slid underneath her bra to cup her breasts, she gasped at the sensation, then nodded at him when he froze, his eyes questioning. Go on. He unsnapped the front and the bra fell open and for a moment he just froze, staring at her as if she shone like witchlight.

Then he bent his head again and the feel of his mouth on her breasts did make her scream. She clapped a hand over her mouth, but he reached up and pried it away. “I want to hear you,” he said, and it wasn’t a demand, but a low, prayerful yearning. She nodded and buried her hands in his hair.

He kissed her shoulders and her breasts, her stomach, her hips; he kissed her everywhere while she gasped and moved against him in ways that made him moan and beg her to stop or it would all be over too soon. She laughed through her gasps, told him to go on, tried to hold herself still but it was impossible.

He stopped before removing each piece of clothing from either of them, asking her with eyes and words if he should keep going, and each time she nodded and said yes, go on, yes. And when finally there was nothing between them but skin, she stilled her hands, thinking that there was no way to ever be closer to another person than this, that to take another step would be like cracking open her chest and exposing her heart.

 She felt Jace’s muscles flex as he reached past her for something, and heard the crackle of foil. “Good thing I brought my wallet,” he said, his voice unsteady.

Suddenly everything seemed very real; she felt a sudden flash of fear. “Wait,” she whispered.

He stilled. His free hand was cradling her head, his elbows dug deep into the sand on either side of her, keeping his weight off her body. All of him was tense and shaking, and the pupils of his eyes were wide, the iris just a rim of gold. “Is something wrong?”

Hearing Jace sound uncertain — she thought maybe her heart was cracking, shattering into pieces. “No,” she whispered. “Just — kiss me,” she pleaded, and he did, not moving to do anything else, just kissing her: hot languorous slow kisses that sped up as his heartbeat did, as the movement of their bodies quickened against each other. Each kiss was different, each rising higher and higher like a spark as a fire grew: quick soft kisses that told her he loved her, long slow worshipful kisses that said that he trusted her, playful light kisses that said that he still had hope, adoring kisses that said he had faith in her as he did in no one else. Clary abandoned herself to the kisses, the language of them, the wordless speech that passed between them. His hands were shaking, but they were quick and skilled on her body, light touches making her want more and more until she pushed and pulled at him, urging him against her with the mute appeal of fingers and lips and hands.

And even at the final moment, when she did flinch, she pressed him to go on, wrapping herself around him, not letting him go. “Jace,” she whispered, and he bent his head to kiss her as he carefully, carefully started to move. She could see in the tension of his body, his grip on her shoulder, that he didn’t want it to be over too quickly: he closed his eyes, his lips moving, silently shaping her name.

 In the past days, weeks, her body had been torn by weapons, by shards of glass, flung through Portals, broken and bruised. Now she let all that fall away, let her body remind itself that it was also a thing that could give pleasure to her, and to the person she loved most in the world.

“I love you,” she said, her hands in his hair. “I love you.”

She saw his eyes widen and something behind his expression crack. The last wall around his heart, the last piece of self-protection he’d held in place. It crumbled away into blazing light as he came undone against her, like sunlight bursting into a room that had been walled up for a long, long time. He buried his face in her neck, saying her name over and over before he collapsed against her shoulder. And when finally Clary closed her eyes she thought she saw the cavern blaze up in gold and white, wrapping them both in heavenly fire, the most beautiful thing she had ever seen.

By the Angel, who needs a cold shower? ;-)

Cassie also tweeted about the bonus content from the different City of Heavenly Fire editions:

Tell us your thoughts and share your fangirling about the DSES in the comments!

Exclusive: Cassandra Clare and Holly Black talk about ‘The Iron Trial’, diversity and a bat (Part Two)

Cassie and Holly_©Cassandra Clare & Holly Black

Here is part two of our interview with Cassie and Holly; click here for part one.

Do not go on reading if you haven’t read The Iron Trial yet. There are major spoilers!

Cathrin: What is the most exciting thing that is going to happen in book two [Holly laughs] that won’t give too much away or what can your readers expect from book two which is hopefully still called The Copper Gauntlet?

Cassie: It is still called The Copper Gauntlet. I think what readers can expect from book two [to Holly] slap me if I say too much! For me the book is a lot about Call and his father now that his father realizes for sure that Call is Constantine Madden, what happens with Call and his dad and also the question of who in the Magisterium finds out the truth about Call and what they do about it.

Holly: Do his friends find out? What does it mean to hide it from them? What would it mean to tell them? It’s a lot of the consequences of what he learned at the end of book one.

Cassie: Call really doesn’t want his friends to know but the more he hides it from Aaron specifically, the worse it looks.

Holly: And also him wrestling of what does it mean to be – potentially – an evil overlord? Like, what does it mean? What about him? Is he evil overlord-like? How much can he monitor himself for evil overlord tendencies? So he’s got a lot of like, ‘Is this being like an evil overlord? Or maybe I should do it or maybe I shouldn’t do it? What would an evil overlord do? Let me do the opposite.’

Cassie: It’s interesting because he’s constantly self-monitoring, like in the way that most of us don’t, ‘Is this a good or evil thing to do?’

Holly: ‘If I were evil, what would I pick from this menu? Is my choice an evil choice?’

Cathrin: But at least he’s got Havoc…

Cassie: He has Havoc who is his …

Holly: Evil pet.

Cassie: Right, he is a little worried that Havoc is an evil pet but he loves Havoc and Havoc loves him. He’s not getting rid of him.

Holly: But he might be an evil pet.

Cassie: He might be evil but Call’s not getting rid of him!

Cathrin: Is there a particular reason why Callum wasn’t in the center of the first cover?

Holly: Yeah, there is a reason. […] If you have heard that there’s a twist in the book, the thing you think that twist is, is when Aaron is revealed to be the Makar and Call isn’t […] In a magic school book where a kid who hasn’t really made much of himself […] we assume a certain set of things. We assume that he is going to find out that he is super, super special and is destined to fight the Big Bad. And so when you realize Aaron is the person who is super, super special and has way more markers of being a hero and then actually is a Makar, he then becomes the person we think of as the main character. In a different book he would be the main character so putting him in the center puts him in that main character/protagonist position and is a nod to that reveal.

Cassie: Actually when we first saw the covers they gave us a number of different positions and designs and we fell in love with that one because the artist was clever enough to put Aaron in the middle.

Cathrin: That’s actually a great answer because it leads to one of my other questions: because Callum isn’t the usual hero, his story doesn’t seem to follow Joseph Campbell’s ‘hero’s journey’, how much fun was it to deviate from this monomyth and how do you think did your readers react to the plot twist or how do you think will your future readers react to it?

Cassie: It was so much fun to deviate. We’ve both done, I think, versions of the hero’s story; I’ve definitely done it with Clary. […] It’s incredibly fun to do something different because we know that story so well we can kind of look at the reverse of the story. It came from a conversation that we were having where Holly constantly observes brilliant and intelligent things and is tragically ignored by her sleeping friends… We were talking about how things in books that mark a character as special and they’re going to be a hero and how they overlap very closely with the things that say ‘This character is gonna be a villain’. This character has a tragic past, that’s a hero thing but it’s also a villain thing. This character has a special powerful power, that’s a hero thing but it’s also a villain thing. This character has a great love that is lost, that’s a hero thing, that’s also a villain thing. We were like, ‘What if we follow what seems like the traditional path? Saying this character has all these marks of a hero’ and then we realize, ‘Oh they’re actually also the same things that mark a villain.’

Cathrin: Is the series set in a particular time – the same as the release year or the early 2000s or is it completely random?

Holly: I think we try to keep it vague so people will not realize, as the story goes on, exactly where it started but I think we can assume that it begins in the year it was published.

Cassie: I would call it nowish.

Holly: Yeah, it’s nowish and as much as you can cheat, nowish is useful to do.

Cassie: I think that, also from what you were saying before, our readers and how they react to the twist: usually very surprised. I have not seen that there were many people who were not pretty surprised, either happy surprised or bad surprised, they’re usually shocked and I get a lot of emails that say, ‘But why? Why?’

Holly: I don’t know how filthy this interview is about to be but you got a great email today!

*There’s unedited use of the f-word in the following answer*

Cassie: Yes! […] It was an email that said, ‘Call is Constantine Madden? Fuck you, fuck you, fuck you.’ [everyone laughs] ‘Fuck you why?’ I said, ‘Holly, this is great!’

Holly: It is, truly. When we sat down to write the book it was that reaction that we were hoping for the most. [laughs again]

Cassie: I was like, ‘This is a beautiful piece of fan mail’. [laughs]

~*~

A very big THANK YOU to Cassie and Holly for answering all of my questions! I had a brilliant time with the two of them and cannot thank them enough for their generosity and kindness.

I would also like to thank the German Magisterium publisher Bastei Lübbe – especially Ms L. – for arranging the interview and for allowing me to havethat much time with Cassie and Holly. Vielen Dank!

And to all our readers out there who will hopefully get to meet Cassie and/or Holly one day: don’t be nervous; only chocolate, which they both love, is sweeter than them ;-)

Exclusive: Cassandra Clare and Holly Black talk about ‘The Iron Trial’, diversity and a bat (Part One)

Cassie and Holly_©Cassandra Clare & Holly Black

Before Cassandra Clare and Holly Black signed their book The Iron Trial in Cologne on November 12, I sat down with Cassie and Holly to chat about plot twists, diversity in novels and how aspiring authors can make writing novels easier.

Since the interview was 25 minutes long and Cassie and Holly also talked about spoilers for The Iron Trial, there will be two parts: the non-spoilery part and the spoilery one which also has an unedited mention of the f-word.

~*~

Cathrin: [Before the interview] You briefly mentioned the cover for The Copper Gauntlet, will the whole series have matching covers?

Cassie: Yeah, as far as we know. They’re all gonna be – they’re all done by Alex Chaudret and they’ll all be in the same style. They won’t all have the same characters but they’ll all be reminiscent of each other like the Percy Jackson covers.

Cathrin: [Since you’re writing Magisterium together] You share one laptop and you push it back and forth, are there also notes scattered around you or is everything relevant inside your heads?

Holly: We actually use a program called Scrivener which I’m super obsessed with and we had put a lot of our notes into the Scrivener file for Magisterium and so when we sit down to write it’s not in a blank chapter, it’s in a chapter with the notes we already put together.

Cassie: We save things like short phrases: ‘Call, Aaron and Tamara go to the test, they fight…’ and then we have to fill it in but we know what the general idea is.

Holly: In Scrivener we also have files on who everyone is at the Magisterium and which year gets which color and which metal and things like that. We can go back and check when we’re in this moment so that is actually the usefulness of writing on one laptop. We can have the master Scrivener file and not have it get confusing where one of us is adding to their own Scrivener file but it doesn’t translate in so we have one set of notes as well as one manuscript.

Cathrin: You are making this interview incredibly easy for me because you’ve mentioned the years and I was wondering: what’s your favorite school year at the Magisterium and why? If you were a student there.

Holly: I assume I would like the last year at the Magisterium. [chuckles] I could laze around, wait to graduate, that would be the greatest year at the Magisterium, right?

Cassie: I don’t know…

Holly: Do you think you’d spend too much time being pressured about the Collegium?

Cassie: Yeah! Cause there’s actually a school after the Magisterium, there’s the Collegium. I feel like I’d spend too much time stressing about what I wanted to do with my life so maybe I would enjoy the silver year the most where I got another year to make decisions.

Cathrin: You’re often at writing retreats with Maureen [Johnson], Sarah [Rees Brennan] and others and there are a lot of funny things that happen when you are together. Did anything really funny or unexpected happen when you were writing The Iron Trial or maybe also the second book?

Cassie: Yeah, the bat!

Holly: Wait, was I there for the bat?

Cassie: You were there for the bat. You were asleep though, weren’t you? Well, it was in Italy.

Holly: No, I wasn’t there.

Cassie: But you came like the next day!

Holly: I did come the next day and I heard about the bat. This bat situation would not have happened if I were there.

Cassie: No, it would not.

Holly: I would have taken this bat situation in hand.

Cassie: It was the night before Holly arrived in Italy so it was me and Sarah and Leigh Bardugo who wrote Ruin and Rising and Leigh had just arrived and Holly was gonna arrive the next morning so we were getting ready to go to dinner. It was this big villa and had a long hallway with these bedrooms off it and a high ceiling and I came out of my room and I saw this bat flying towards me. I’m terrified of bats, I’m terrified of rabies so I screamed. I was like, ‘Sarah, can I come into your room?’ And she said, ‘Nooo, I’m naked.’ And I was like, ‘I don’t care!’ I burst into her room, she was naked and she was like, ‘Why would you do that? Why would anyone do that?’ And I was like, ‘A bat is chasing me!’ She said, ‘That can’t be!’ So she goes out in the hallway, basically naked, she was wearing underwear and she’s like, ‘There can’t be a bat’ And the bat swoops towards her and then she starts running but she is just running naked up and down the hallway, the bat’s chasing her and then Leigh comes out of her bedroom and Sarah is running up and down the hallway naked, screaming and she [Leigh] was like, ‘I don’t even wanna know.’ [Cassie and Holly both laugh] We had to spend half an hour getting rid of the bat. … If Holly had been there, she would have made friends with the bat.

Cathrin: I think I would also have run away. … Let’s talk about diversity [Holly laughs because of the sudden shift in topics] How strongly do you as authors feel the readers’ need for more diversity in Young Adult novels or in novels in general?

Holly: I definitely think it’s much needed. Malinda Lo has done a really great job of putting together statistics and they are sobering! When you see how consistent the level is and how low the level is, of representation across the board in terms of people’s color, in terms of …

Cassie: Non able-bodied characters…

Holly: Yeah, they’re really sobering statistics. Obviously it’s still something that publishing has not figured out how to address.

Cathrin: So they still have a long way to go.

Holly: We have a long way to go… And actually, I have been thinking about this because we have been talking about this in different places, we all sort of notice and think, ‘What can we personally do about it? What can we do about it today?’ What we can do today – I’m gonna recommend three books that I think that anyone reading this might enjoy. Since this [Magisterium] is a middle grade series, I’m gonna recommend two middle grade books: Coe Booth’s Kinda Like Brothers which came out this year. Absolutely great and Varian Johnson’s The Great Green Heist; really fun! Really great. I think there’s gonna be a sequel and then – since I know that many people are reading YA books who might be reading this – Alaya Dawn Johnson’s Love Is the Drug. They are recent releases and they are all great! And if we all listen to this and go ahead and buy these books today, we will have made a difference! … I think about this because we’re talking about this so much and I have been thinking, ‘What can we all do?’ We can do this.

Cathrin: Great! So you’ve written this book together and you’re writing the other books together, what advice would you give friends who are writing a book together so that they don’t fight?

Holly: When we’ve talked to people, a lot of times what they talk about is having disagreements. Having things where one of them wants one thing and one of them wants another thing and I think that the thing we have always talked about is that believing that if you get to the core of why you want something and your buddy gets to the core of why they want something, there’s a way to have both those things. There is a third way.

Cassie: For me it’s the idea of if you’re having an argument and you want one thing and the other person wants another thing, you both have to give up. You’re not gonna get your thing, what you have to do is work together to find a third solution. So it stops it from being a fight about ‘I want this and you want that’ and you’re alike, ‘Instead we work to find thing three’.

Holly: I think just having a very similar view of the characters, like really knowing who they are and both of you kind of believing that they’re the same people. I think if we didn’t have that I think we really would have a rough time.

Cassie: Yeah, most of our arguments are about pacing and timing like when something happens. We argued in the car today.

Holly: Yeah, it was all about, ‘Is it going in this book or the next book?’

Cassie: Which is not an argument about ‘Does this happen?’ We both agreed it happens, absolutely it happens, but when.

Holly: Where does it fit in? How does it fit in? So those are arguments that are easier to have than ‘Who is this person?’ You have to start from a place of building that together.

Cathrin: This is another writing question. Holly, you’ve got a little boy; Cassie, you’ve got your godsons and I was wondering if you could picture yourselves writing a book for even younger readers and since your characters, Cassie, in the Shadowhunter Chronicles have grown [up], if you could imagine writing for older readers (New Adult books)?

Holly: I will say this: I sat down and tried to write a picture book [pauses] and I haven’t figured that out for me yet. I thought, ‘Yeah, sure. I can write a picture book.’ I’m not so sure. It’s tough! It’s a very tough format. […] Picture books are like an iceberg and you see the little bit on top and there is all of this stuff underneath that you have to make work. I think about Mo Willems’ Don’t Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus, a book that is genius – GENIUS! – because it allows the child to both identify with the disobedient pigeon who is doing this bad thing and also to be the person who for once gets to say no. That kind of thinking [pauses again] breaks my brain! I would love to do it but I’m not sure I know even the first way how.

Cassie: Picture books are very, very difficult. It’s like a poem, you have to say everything in a much smaller period of time but for my godsons I would love to write something that is younger than this [Magisterium]. More like around the age for six-year-olds, about twins that were detectives.

Cathrin: That sounds cool!

Cassie: I think they would love that! There’s such a unique relationship, watching them grow up. They are always together, everything they do is together, the other person is like just a part of you, they are always there. And so I think that would be really fun to explore. […] They sleep in the same room, they sleep at the same time, they eat at the same time, they do everything together and I was spending so much time with them and I was like, ‘Aw, it’d be fun if they had a book about kids like them.’

Holly: I would have written that book!

Cassie: I know but this is my book. [both laugh]

Holly: I’m excited to watch her write really short. It’s like a dream.

Cassie: I’ll just write one really long thing and then chop it up randomly.

Cathrin: So the New Adult… maybe more snippets, like you did with Tessa and Jem?

Cassie: I really enjoyed writing After the Bridge and I would do more. Most people really liked it but I kept getting the same comment from people, ‘I don’t think it’s right that you write this kind of thing about underage people’ and I was like, ‘They are a hundred and forty!’ [Holly laughs] ‘They are not underage, they are senior citizens! They are ancient!’ […] It actually wasn’t even that explicit, it was clear what was going on –

Holly: I’m not sure it was New Adult.

Cassie: I would not pass my stories as New Adult, they would want it to be much more explicit. I don’t know if I write this about Clary and Jace, Julian and … you know, whoever [laughter], am I gonna get all these cranky comments? I don’t know, it made me wonder. But it was really fun to write and I might do it again. Maybe something about Will and Tessa after they’re married cause you can’t really object to people having sex after they’re married. I mean, come on, they’re married!

Cathrin: Holly, you’ve written about faeries and vampires and you’ve also written about people with magical abilities. What do you think is so fascinating about fantasy creatures that the readers buy your books and buy so many fantasy books in general?

Holly: I think that fantasy allows us to talk about the real world in a different way. We all have had the experience of getting angry, so angry that we were afraid that we’d say something or do something that we hurt the people we care about and if you take something like a werewolf and you literalize that. You say: Once a month this person becomes a monster, you’re no longer asking the question ‘Is it okay to feel that way?’ That’s just accepted, it is what it is and now you tell a different story of what it’s like to be out of control. I think because we get to come at life in a different way, we get to think about it differently, too. So I think that’s the value of fantasy. We can tell our own stories in different ways and the more we are able to make them malleable and turn them around, the more we’re able to see different sides of them.

Cathrin: Cassie, before the interview we talked about Simon and Isabelle in Tales from the Shadowhunter Academy, but let’s quickly talk about another installment: there is one about the Circle and then there is also The Secret Treasons [the graphic novel project], is it still a project?

Cassie: Secret Treasons is on hold because we couldn’t do The Secret Treasons and the Shadowhunter Academy at the same time because then I would have two sets of projects that are set at the Academy, going on at the same time and they’d contradict each other so there was no way to keep the continuity going so we have The Secret Treasons on hold. We’re doing Shadowhunter Academy first and then whatever is established as canon about the Shadowhunter Academy in Tales from the Shadowhunter Academy will be the canon for The Secret Treasons. We tried it and it’s impossible. I was working out the stories with Sarah, Maureen and Robin [Wasserman] and at the same time I was doing notes for Secret Treasons and getting back from my co-writer blocks of stuff about what was going to happen [in Tales from the Shadowhunter Academy] that totally were contradicting the other stuff and I was like, ‘I can’t do both at the same time.’ And it’s a lot of stuff. […] The Simon and Isabelle stuff is really fun, actually. They’re in this really interesting situation: she loves Simon now and we started out with he kinda liked her and she was like, ‘Ugh, Simon!’ And now it’s really flipped because she loves him and because she knows him and the Simon that she knows doesn’t remember her! There is this beautiful girl, who’s really nice, who really seems to like him and he’s like ‘I … don’t know what to do about it’ so it’s really tough for Isabelle because she is both really confident but also a person who has issues about trust and so what does she do in a situation where she has to either walk away or trust that Simon is going to fall in love with her again? It’s a really hard thing to do with yourself, to put yourself out there. […] I really felt for her, ‘That’s really scary.’ So we get to see how that’s gonna play out.

~*~

Click here for the spoilery part of the interview.

 

Emma and Mark talk about love in new ‘The Dark Artifices’ snippet

 

Art by Cassandra Jean

 

Cassandra Clare is close to finishing Lady Midnight and she has shared another snippet from the first book in her The Dark Artifices trilogy. In this new snippet Emma Carstairs and Mark Blackthorn talk about Mark’s time with the Wild Hunt and love, but see for yourselves:

“Have I?” asked Mark. “Is this my home?” He looked over at Emma. “I can say this to you because you are not a Blackthorn. You do not have Blackthorn blood running through your veins. I have been in the land of Faerie for years and it is a place where mortal blood is turned to fire. It is a place of beauty and terror beyond what can be imagined here. I have ridden with the Wild Hunt. I have carved a clear path of freedom among the stars and outrun the wind. And now I am asked to walk upon the earth again.”

“You belong where you’re loved,” Emma said. It was something her father had said, something she had always believed. She belonged here because Jules loved her and the children loved her. “Were you loved in Faerie?”

A shadow seemed to come down over Mark’s eyes, like curtains closing in a dark room.

snippet from Lady Midnight illustrated with the first of the Dark Artifices flower cards by Cassandra Jean

There is no release date for Lady Midnight yet but let’s cross our fingers for next year!

TMI TV Tuesday: The Importance of Staying True to the Books

The Mortal Instruments

Every Tuesday, TMI Source and Fangirlish are bringing you TMI TV Tuesdays, where we discuss different aspects regarding the upcoming television adaptation of The Mortal Instruments.

With every adaptation there is a great risk of the source material being altered to extremes. As fans of Cassandra Clare’s books, our first obligation is to the world and the characters that live and breath on the pages. And when the time comes for them to make their way from the pages to the screen, we hope with every fiber of our being that they’ll be treated with care and respect.

It’s important to note that with any adaptation there are certain liberties that the showrunner, producers or studio will take as they adapt it for the big or small screen. But there’s a huge difference between changes that are necessary and changes that are forced and will negatively affect the adaptation.

It feels sort of repetitive and you have to wonder why it even needs to be said, but The Mortal Instruments television show must stay true to the books. And, no, I don’t mean that every single thing that happens in the books must be portrayed to a tee on the small screen. But the important events and the spirit of the Shadowhunter world must remain intact. Because it’s not the Shadowhunter world without it. And it might as well be an entirely different show altogether.

One of the problems with The Mortal Instruments: City of Bones were the changes to things that were actually quite important to the story and the overall series, like Valentine not ending up with the Mortal Cup by film’s end. That was a significant change that affected the plot of the then-second-planned film. It was imperative that Valentine wind up with the Cup — that Clary had to lose something so that she was motivated to fight back, that Valentine posed an immediate threat. All of that was taken away because of the decision to have Clary come away victorious with the Cup. You don’t grow as a person because you win, you grow because you fail and then rise up and keep fighting back. That’s the spirit we all fell in love with. And that’s the spirit I hope remains intact in the show.

The simple fact is that there are going to be changes. There are going some things that are left and some things that are added as a means to move the show along. But that doesn’t mean they’re going to be bad. You might even find them needed. The important thing is to recognize the things that you can change and things that you can’t. It’s not merely because the fans want it but also because it’s important to the spirit of the series.

Speaking in regards to television, there are certain shows that have gotten it right and others that have gotten it wrong (more on that in a future TMI TV Tuesday), but the important thing to note right now is that The Mortal Instruments has the chance to redeem itself. It can be one of these shows that people talk about when they talk about great adaptations, or it can be one that people laugh about how it went horribly wrong. But I have faith that those at Constantin and Ed Decter know the importance of being faithful to the books and will deliver us a show that the fans and Cassandra Clare’s characters deserve.

Angelic Power Rune

Head over to FANGIRLISH on Thursday to read their thoughts on why  it’s important that The Mortal Instruments staying true to the source material, and check back every Tuesday for TMI TV TUESDAYS.

What are your thoughts? How important is it to you that they stay as true to the series as possible? What would be your reaction if they took to many liberties with it? Sound off in the comments!

Exclusive: Cassandra Clare talks ‘The Bane Chronicles’ audiobook + listen to a clip from Magnus’ voicemail

The Bane Chronicles

The Bane Chronicles hits stores today in all of its hardback and audiobook glory, and we’re bringing you an exclusive interview with Cassandra Clare as she talks about the audiobook and how they brought together different actors to voice each individual installment.

We’ve also got an exclusive clip from Magnus’ voicemail, featuring messages from Alec and Isabelle Lightwood!

The Bane Chronicles is now available to own in hardback, audiobook and eBook.

Jace gives advice to Julian in new ‘The Dark Artifices’ snippet

The Dark Artifices

Cassandra Clare has shared a new The Dark Artifices snippet with her fans and it’s a really awesome one because there’s Emma, Julian and one Mister Jace Herondale in it. See for yourselves:

“You’ve got a lot of responsibility now,” Jace said to Julian. “You’ll have to make sure Emma winds up with a guy who deserves her.”

Julian was strangely white-faced. Maybe he was feeling the effects of the ceremony, Emma thought. It had been strong magic; she still felt it sizzling through her blood like champagne bubbles. But Jules looked as if he’d been slapped.

“What about me?” Emma said, quickly. “Don’t I have to make sure Jules winds up with someone who deserves him?”

“Absolutely. I did it for Alec, Alec did it for me — well, actually, he hated Clary at first, but he came around.”

“I bet you didn’t like Magnus much, either,” said Julian, still with the same odd, stiff look on his face.

“Maybe not,” said Jace, “but I never would have said so.”

“Because it would have hurt Alec’s feelings?” Emma asked.

“No,” said Jace, “because Magnus would have turned me into a hat rack.”

There is no release date for Lady Midnight yet.

Ask Cassandra Clare and Holly Black your ‘Magisterium’ questions!

Iron Trial Eng-Ger

Casandra Clare and Holly Black are about to go on the second leg of their European Magisterium tour where they’ll have signings in Antwerp, Belgium (November 9); Hamburg, Germany (Nov. 11.); Cologne, Germany (Nov. 12.) and Vienna, Austria (Nov. 14). Thanks to the German publisher Bastei Lübbe, TMI Source will be interviewing Cassie and Holly on November 12 and we need your The Iron Trial questions! We’ll also try to ask a few questions about Cassandra’s and Holly’s other books.

Comment down below with your questions (in English or in German) and we’ll pick the best ones for our interview.

The deadline is November 9, 3 pm EST.

TMI TV Tuesday: Five Reasons Why ‘The Mortal Instruments’ Will Work Better As A TV Series

TMI banner

Every Tuesday, TMI Source and Fangirlish are bringing you TMI TV Tuesdays, where we discuss different aspects regarding the upcoming television adaptation of The Mortal Instruments.

If at first you don’t succeed, try again. That’s the mindset Constantin has in regards to reviving The Mortal Instruments as a television series. While the series failed as a film franchise, there is renewed hope in regards to it lighting up the small screen. And, frankly, this is a good thing.

While there have been several successful YA film franchises, including The Hunger Games, Divergent and Twilight, there have been more than double as many failures, The Mortal Instruments included. But sometimes a two and half hour film doesn’t work when adapting a 500-page book filled with world building and character development. But the important thing is The Mortal Instruments may have found new life in the television world.

Here are five reasons why we believe The Mortal Instruments will work better as a television show.

1. More Time For World Building

One of the problems with The Mortal Instruments: City of Bones was the lack of world building for those unfamiliar with the material. But even then, fans were still very much looking forward to seeing the world come to life through a different medium. It’s not that they didn’t try, it’s just there was no time to do so in a way that the source material was owed. That’s one of the challenges faced with adapting not only a 500-page book into a two and half hour film but one with so much rich history that can get lost in the shuffle. With a television show you’re given at minimum 13 hours or maximum 23 hours per season. There is going to be so much time at showrunner Ed Decter’s disposal as he’s crafting a way to introduce this world and flesh it out through the eyes of our heroine Clary Fray.

2. Fleshing Out the Characters

One of the things that I love so much about television is the amount of time you have to dedicate to your characters. It’s the same thing that applies in books and it’s why the series has such an impact on its reader or viewer. When done right it’s like you’re being treated to a one-hour short film every week and you get to know the characters on a much deeper level than you’d ever get to on film. Not only will we get to really dig deep with our main cast of characters, but the minor characters that we’ve grown to love will get their chance to shine. Remember how they cut Rafael from the film? That needn’t be a problem on the show, where Decter can take an entire episode to not only flesh out his character in the present, but as well as in the past. It also provides an opportunity to explore unseen — well, in this case unread – stories involving the characters. The characters are the heart and soul of Cassie’s books and for the series to truly shine, they will have to be the heart and soul of the show, as well.

3. Telling the Story Right

When you task yourself with crafting a film based on a 500-page book it’s obvious that some story lines are going to get the ax. And that rang true for The Mortal Instruments: City of Bones, which featured either an extreme condensing or a complete deletion of scenes in its screen adaptation. While there’s no promise that everything that happens in the books will happen on the show, there’s much more time to flesh out certain story lines and really take the time to tell the story right. There’s no need to rush through or completely ignore certain scenes due to time restrictions. And unlike in a film where you can’t undo a mistake, if something isn’t working on the show you can fix it in the upcoming episodes.

4. More to Work With 

With movies you only have so much to work with and so little time to do so. With television there will be more time to fully utilize the source material from the entire series and not just City of Bones. Reports have indicated that they will start with City of Bones and then slowly delve into the other five books. There is so much story to work with in just City of Bones alone and you have at most 22 hours to work with in telling an entire season arc. Also, since Constantin owns the rights for all of Cassie’s works, who’s to say we couldn’t possibly get flashbacks hinting at the times of The Infernal Devices somewhere far down the road? The possibilities are endless when you have so much time and story to work with.

5. Less Pressure to Succeed

The make-or-break factor in aspiring film franchises — whether it’s Young Adult or not — is money. That’s the goal for big-budget studios. It’s the most important thing. And you normally get one shot with opening weekend. Now with television, it’s more about the viewers than the money. The viewers dictate advertisers and advertising costs. But you see, they’re both aimed at making money — it’s what this world revolves around — but it’s not about the viewers’ money (in most cases), it’s about the advertisers’ money. How much are they going to pay for an ad to run during a network’s most popular show? But let’s not mistake it, pressure is still very much a factor. It’s just ratings pressure and it’s not as intense as making sure you hit a $60 million opening weekend. And unlike with films you get more than one shot to shine. With movies it’s opening weekend or bust. For television it’s weekly ratings or bust, but sometimes if a show’s social media presence is strong enough they’ll give it another shot.

Angelic Power Rune

Head over to FANGIRLISH on Thursday to read their thoughts on why The Mortal Instruments will work better as a television series, and check back every Tuesday for TMI TV TUESDAYS.

What are your thoughts? Why do you think The Mortal Instruments could possibly work better as a television show?

goodreads Choice Awards 2014: Vote for Cassandra Clare and Holly Black!

The end of the year is approaching so it’s time for the goodreads Choice Awards 2014!

Cassandra Clare’s City of Heavenly Fire – the final novel in her The Mortal Instruments series – as well as her middle grade book The Iron Trial, which she co-wrote with Holly Black, are nominated for Best Young Adult Fantasy & Science Fiction of 2014 and Best Middle Grade & Children’s of 2014 respectively.

CoHF Iron Trial

Cassie’s City of Lost Souls and Clockwork Princess came second in 2013 and 2014, they only lost against Veronica Roth’s Divergent series. City of Heavenly Fire and The Iron Trial are up against stiff competition, but we can do it this year!

 

Vote for City of Heavenly Fire.

Vote for The Iron Trial.

 

Here’s goodreads voting schedule:

Opening Round Nov. 3 – 8
Semifinal Round Nov. 10 – 15
Final Round Nov. 17 – 24

 

Happy voting :-)

Mark is called a half-blood in new ‘The Dark Artifices’ snippet

http://25.media.tumblr.com/09880ae563f11ee80ad9463e5bc1b754/tumblr_mtlbm5yN5H1r3oy4vo2_500.jpg

Art by Cassandra Jean

Some fans are already halfway in love with Mark Blackthorn whom we met in City of Heavenly Fire and Cassandra Clare catered to their needs with sharing a snippet about him:

“Loved?” he said in a cold voice. “Do you no longer? Remember, half-blood, I know  that you can lie.”

Mark flicked his eyes up. He saw the storm in those eyes, but behind the storm he saw two boys as small as stars in a distant sky, locked together under a blanket.

What a mysterious snippet, right? Who do you think are the two boys? Sound off in the comments!

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